The Agile Executive

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Posts Tagged ‘Erik Huddleston

Apropos – The Inovis End-to-End Kanban System

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Figure 1:  End-to-end flow slide from Reformulating the Product Delivery Process

Erik HuddlestonWalter BodwellStephen Chin and I delivered a presentation at LSSC10 on the design and implementation of the end-to-end Kanban system Apropos at Inovis. The presentation highlights four key ingredients of the ‘secret sauce’ that makes Apropos so powerful:

  • Stakeholder Based Investment Themes
  • Business Case Management
  • Upstream and Downstream WIP Limits
  • Dynamic Allocations

You can read the slides here. A recording of the presentation will soon be posted by InfoQ. A commercial friendly open-source license of the code will be available on May 22, 2010.

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Reformulating the Product Delivery Process

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LSSC ATLANTA 2010

Erik Huddleston, Walter Bodwell, Stephen Chin and I will  present and demo an end-to-end Kanban system that addresses the #1 challenge modern software methods pose – reformulation of the product delivery process. We will do so the coming Friday, April 23, 10:45AM at the Lean Software and Systems Conference. Here is the abstract for our presentation/demo:

Software methods can be viewed as the glue that holds the product development process together. With Kanban, the glue is melting on both sides of the process. Traditional portfolio management systems and organizations have difficulty coping with the granularity of Kanban. Likewise, today’s product release and delivery systems and the corresponding organizational constructs are ill-equipped to effectively handle the Kanban flow.

We present a field-tested system for implementing Kanban on an end-to-end basis – from product ideation through continuous delivery. This system reformulates the deconstructed product delivery process to strike an optimal balance between planning, development and operations.

Written by israelgat

April 21, 2010 at 3:25 am

How to Use Observations From Outside the Agile Process

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a9723 The Whorl of Architecture by tengtan.

Photo credit: tengtan (Flickr)

Most posts on technical debt in this blog emphasize the use of technical debt for strategic decision-making. In this post we will point out the use of technical debt in Agile teams at the tactical level. Specifically:

  • Every two weeks; and/or,
  • With every build.

Taking a close look at the various components of technical debt during the  bi-weekly iteration review meeting provides plenty of useful information to the process. For example, you might look for insights to explain the following:

  • Why is the unit test coverage figure going down?
  • Any particular reason the cyclomatic complexity figure has gone up?
  • Why is the figure of merit for design lower than the figure indicated in the previous iteration review meeting?
  • Many others…

The emphasis in this mode of operation is on guiding the retrospection. Plenty of good and valid reasons might exist for any of the trends mentioned above. However, observing the trends helps you ask the right questions, focusing on what happened during the iteration just completed. In conjunction with technical debt data from previous iteration review meetings, trends that characterize your software development project become visible. You may or may not need to change anything you are doing, but you become very conscious of any “let’s not change” decision.

An intriguing practice suggested by colleague and friend Erik Huddleston is to make technical debt a criterion for the build to pass. The build automatically fails if the technical debt figure has gone up. Or, if you are very focused on a specific aspect of technical debt such as complexity, you fail the build whenever the complexity figure of merit rises above  a certain pre-determined threshold. For example, you might fail a build in which the cyclomatic complexity per method has exceeded 4.

The power of failing a build whenever the technical debt arises is in utilizing the build as an exceptionally effective influence point. You instill the discipline of reducing technical debt one build at a time. If your team aggressively practices continuous integration, it will address technical debt issues multiple times a day. Instead of staring at a “mountain” of technical debt towards the release of a product, you chunk it to really small increments that get addressed “real-time.” For instance, a build that failed due to lack of comments can usually be fixed very quickly by the developer who “upset the apple cart” while the logic embedded in the code is fresh on his/her mind.

A good insight to the way the tactical use of technical debt techniques adds value is provided by the following observation: the technical debt data is observed from outside the Agile process. Hence, technical debt data  is nicely suited to guiding the process. If you think of the software engineering fabric as a virtual stack, the technical debt “layer” could be considered a layer above the Agile process.

The Agile Flywheel

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Readers of The Agile Executive have been exposed to the “All In!” strategy used by Erik Huddleston to transform the software engineering process at Inovis and make it uniquely streamlined. In this post we follow up on the original discussion of the subject to explore the effect of Agile on IT Operations. As the title implies, Agile at Inovis served as a flywheel which created the momentum required to transform IT Operations and blend the best of Agile with the best of ITIL.

This guest post was written by Ray Riescher – a Six Sigma Black Belt, Agile evangelist and a business process change agent. Ray is currently responsible for business process management and IT governance at Inovis, a  leading provider of business-to-business (B2B) e-commerce services, in Alpharetta, GA

Here is Ray:

When we converted to an Agile Scrum software methodology some 24 months ago, I never imagined the lessons I’d learn and the organizational change that would be driven by the adoption of Scrum.

I’ve lived by the philosophy that managing a business is managing its processes and that all of those processes, especially the operational processes, are interconnected.  However, I don’t think I was fully prepared for effect Agile Scrum would have on our company operations.

We dove head first into Agile Scrum and adapted to it very quickly. However, it wasn’t until we landed a very large and demanding customer that Scrum was really put to the test. New enhancements, new features, and new configurations were all needed ASAP.  Scrum delivered with rapid development and deployment in the form of releases that were moving into production with amazing velocity. Our release cadence hit warp drive and at one point we experienced several months where multiple teams’ production releases were deploying at the end of every two week sprint.

We’ve subscribed to the ITIL service support processes for Release, Change, Incident, Problem and Configuration Management. ITIL has served us well, giving us a common language and a clear understanding of process boundaries.

As the Scrum release cadence kicked in, the downstream ITIL processes had to keep up, adapt, and support the dynamics of rapid production changes.  What happened was enlightening and maybe a bit ground breaking.

The Release Management process had to reassess its reliance on artifacts for gate keeping. The levels of sign offs had to be streamlined, the heavyweight deployment documentation had to be lightened, yet the process still had to control the production release to ensure deployment success.  The rapidity of the release cycles meant that maintenance window downtime would be experienced too frequently by customers, so “rolling bounce” deployment strategies were devised and implemented.

Change requests could no longer wait for a weekly Change Management review board to approve and schedule the changes.  Change management risk models had to be relied on for accurate detection of risky changes.

Early on in this dynamic environment, we weren’t quite as good as we needed to be and our Incident Management process was put to the test.  Faster releases meant more opportunity for problems with service degradation and outages. This reality manifested itself more frequently than we’d ever experienced. Monitoring, detecting and repairing became paramount for environment stability and customer satisfaction.

What we found out was that we became very agile at this break/fix game. We developed a small team approach to managing incidents and leveraged the ITIL Problem Management process to rapidly perform root cause analysis. Once the true root cause was determined, a fix would be defined and deployed. Sometimes the fix was software related and went through the Scrum process, sometimes the fix was hardware related and went through the Configuration Management process, other times it was more operational and the fix took the form of training or corrections to procedural documentation.

The point is we’ve become agile across the entire IT spectrum. Whether it’s development via Scrum, the velocity with which we now operate our ITIL processes, or the integrated break/fix operational support processes, we are performing all of these with an agile mindset and discipline. We have small teams, working on priorities, and completing what needs to be completed now.

Scrum set the flywheel in motion and caused the rest of the IT process life cycle to respond.  ITIL’s processes still form the solid core of service support and we’ve improved the processes’ capability to handle intense work velocity. The organization adapted by developing unprecedented speed in the ability to deliver production fixes and to solve root cause problems with agility.

What I think we are witnessing is a manifestation of Agile Business Service Management; a holistic agile methodology running across the IT process spectrum that’s delivering eye popping change and tremendous results.

Predicting the Year Ahead

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Cutter Consortium has published predictions for 2010 by about a dozen of its experts. My own prediction, which examines the crash of 1929, the burst of the “dot-com bubble” in 2000 and the financial collapse in 2008, is actually quite bullish:

I expect 2010 to be the first year of a prolonged golden age. Serious as the various problems we all are wrestling with after the 2008-2009 macro-economic crisis are, they should be viewed as systemic to the way a new generation of revolutionary infrastructure gets assimilated in economy and society.

In addition to the techno-economic view expressed in the Cutter prediction, here are my Agile themes for 2010:

  • Agile moves “downstream” into Release Management.
  • Agile breaks out of Development into IT (and beyond) in the form of Agile Infrastructure and Agile Business Service Management.
  • SOA and Agile start to be linked in enterprise architecture and software/hardware/SaaS organizations.
  • Kanban starts an early adoption cycle similar to Scrum in 2006.

Acknowledgements: I am thankful to my colleagues Walter Bodwell, Sebastian HassingerErik Huddleston, Michael Cote and Annie Shum who influenced my thinking during 2009 and contributed either directly and indirectly to the themes listed above.

The “All In!” Approach to Agile Rollout – Austin and Atlanta

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The June 18 “Ask and Expert” session of Agile Austin poses a unique opportunity to to discuss the pros and cons of the “All In!” approach with Erik Huddleston– an Agile champion who has successfully implemented Scrum in this manner. Bringing Scum to Inovis in 2007, Erik opted for an “All In!” implementation instead of the more customary team-by-team rollout. The Inovis case study is one of the very few authoritative sources on this gutsy approach.

If you can’t attend the clinic in Austin on the 18th, you might want to watch out for his forthcoming Agile Success Tour panel session in Atlanta, GA on the 25th. Erik’s insights will be posted  here and here a few days after the event.

Written by israelgat

June 13, 2009 at 2:04 pm

“More Than One Way to Roll-Out Agile”

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Ryan posted part I of the debate between Erik Huddleston (Inovis), Jack Yang (Homeaway) and me on the subject of Agile roll-out strategies. The heart of the debate is team-by-team versus all-in. To paraphrase Robert Graves, the debate is true and the telling is frank. Highly recommended!

Part II and Part III have been  posted [IG; 4/11/2009]

Written by israelgat

March 11, 2009 at 8:37 pm