The Agile Executive

Making Agile Work

Posts Tagged ‘Software Quality

How to Use Technical Debt Data in the M&A Process

leave a comment »

http://www.flickr.com/photos/brajeshwar/266749872/

As a starting point, please read Implication of Technical Debt Uncertainty for Software Licensing Negotiations. Everything stated there holds for negotiating M&A deals. In particular:

  • You (as the buyer) should insist on conducting a Technical Debt Assessment as part of the due diligence process.
  • You should be able to deduct the monetized technical debt figure from the price of the acquisition.
  • You should be able to quantify the execution risk (as far as software quality is concerned).

An important corollary holds with respect to acquiring a company who is in the business of doing maintenance on an open source project, helping customers deploy it and training them in its use. You can totally eliminate uncertainty about the quality of the open source project without needing to negotiate permission to conduct technical debt assessment. Actually, you will be advised to conduct the assessment of the software prior to approaching the target company. By so doing, you start negotiations from a position of strength, quite possibly having at your disposal (technical debt) data that the company you consider acquiring does not possess.

Action item: Supplement the traditional due diligence process with a technical debt assessment. Use the monetized technical debt figure to assess execution risk and drive the acquisition price down.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/tantek/254940135/

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

Negotiating a major M&A deal? Let me know if you would like assistance in conducting a technical debt assessment and bringing up technical debt issues with the target company. I will help you with negotiating the acquisition price down. Click Services for details and contact information.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

Advertisements

Written by israelgat

October 20, 2010 at 5:37 am

What 108M Lines of Code Tell Us

with 16 comments

Results of the first annual report on application quality have just been released by CAST. The company analyzed 108M lines of code in 288 applications from 75 companies in various industries. In addition to the ‘usual suspects’ –  COBOL, C/C++, Java, .NET – CAST included Oracle 4GL and ABAP in the report.

The CAST report is quite important in shedding light on the code itself. As explained in various posts in this blog, this transition from the process to its output is of paramount importance. Proficiency in the software process is a bit allusive. The ‘proof of the pudding’ is in the output of the software process. The ability to measure code quality enables effective governance of the software process. Moreover, Statistical Process Control methods can be applied to samples of technical debt readings. Such application is most helpful in striking a good balance in ‘stopping the line’ – neither too frequently nor too rarely.

According to CAST’s report, the average technical debt per line of code across all application is $2.82.  This figure, depressing that it might be, is reasonably consistent with quick eyeballing of Nemo. The figure is somewhat lower than the average technical debt figure reported recently by Cutter for a sample of the Cassandra code. (The difference is probably attributable to the differences in sample sizes between the two studies). What the data means is that the average business application in the CAST study is saddled with over $1M in technical debt!

An intriguing finding in the CAST report is the impact of size on the quality of COBOL applications.  This finding is demonstrated in Figure 1. It has been quite a while since I last saw such a dramatic demonstration of the correlation between size and quality (again, for COBOL applications in the CAST study).

Source: First Annual CAST Worldwide Application Software Quality Study – 2010

One other intriguing findings in the CAST study is that “application in government sector show poor changeability.” CAST hypothesizes that the poor changeability might be due to higher level of outsourcing in the government sector compared to the private sector. As pointed out by Amy Thorne in a recent comment posted in The Agile Executive, it might also be attributable to the incentive system:

… since external developers often don’t maintain the code they write, they don’t have incentives to write code that is low in technical debt…

Congratulations to Vincent Delaroche, Dr. Bill Curtis, Lev Lesokhin and the rest of the CAST team. We as an industry need more studies like this!

Round Two: Can Technical Debt Constitute a Breach of Implied Warranties?

with 2 comments

In a previous post I discussed whether technical debt could under some conditions constitute a breach of implied warranties. Examining the subject with respect to intent, I made the following observation:

It is a little tricky (though not impossible – see Using Credit limits to Constrain Development on Margin) to define the precise point where technical debt becomes “unmanaged.” One needs to walk a fine line between technical/methodical incompetence and resource availability to determine technical fraud. For example, if your code has 35% coverage, is it or is not unmanaged? Does the answer to this question change if your cyclomatic complexity per class exceeds 30? I would think the courts might be divided for a very long time on the question when does hidden technical debt represent a fraudulent misrepresentation.

One component  of technical debt deserves special attention in the context of this post. I am referring to the conscious decision not to do unit testing at all… Such a conscious decision IMHO indicates no intention to pay back this category of technical debt – unit test coverage. It is therefore quite incompatible with the nature of an implied warranty:

Responses to my post were mixed. Various readers who are much more knowledgeable in the law than I am pointed out various legal defenses a software vendor could use. Click here for a deeper understanding of these subtle legal points.

Imagine my delight reading yesterday’s uTest interview with Cem Kaner. Cem makes the following statement in his interview:

ALI [American Law Institute] … started writing the Principles of the Law of Software Contracts. One of its most important rules is one that I advocated: a seller of software who knows about a defect of the software but does not disclose the defect to the customer will be held liable for damages caused to that customer by that defect. Note that this does not apply to free software (not sold). And if the seller discloses the defect, it becomes part of the product’s specification (it’s a feature). And if the seller doesn’t know about the defect there is no liability (once customers tell you about a defect, you have knowledge, so you cannot avoid knowledge for long by not testing). ALI adopted it unanimously last year. This is not law, but until the legislatures pass statutes, the Principles will be an important guide for judges. Even though I am a minor contributor to this work, I think the defect-disclosure requirement might be my career’s most important contribution to software quality. [Highlights by IG].

While not (yet?) a law, the Principles could indeed lead us where IMHO we as an industry should be. Technical debt manifests itself as bugs. By making the specific bugs part of the spec the software evolves from a quality standpoint. Moreover, the defect-disclosure requirement practically force software vendors to address their bugs within a “reasonable” amount of time. Customer bugs become an antidote to the relentless pressure to add functions and features without paying due attention to software quality.

I guess I missed the opportunity to include technical debt in the 2010 revision of the Principles. As we always do in software, I will target the next rev…

Turning the “Law of Software Physics” Upside Down

leave a comment »

Agile Event

Next week, Michael Mah will be presenting new quantitative data on software productivity, cost, time-to-market and quality. Here is an excerpt from the announcement of his talk:

Many companies are adopting Agile practices in an effort to increase project throughput, reduce cost, and improve quality. But are they working? Drawing from industry statistics, Michael answers vital questions about Agile’s effectiveness, which may be turning the “law of software physics” upside down. Until now, there have been predictable relationships among schedule, staffing, and quality; industry data indicates Agile may be changing all this. See productivity findings at 5 Agile companies, and the results for time-to-market, productivity, and quality. Learn the right practices for your environment, including characteristics of successful measurement. See how metrics reveal insights into Agile approaches that are becoming mainstream.

Knowing Michael (and, well, knowing a bit about his latest and greatest findings…) I have every reason to believe Michael will be breaking new grounds in his presentation. Click here and here for details about this exciting presentation.

Written by israelgat

March 5, 2010 at 12:34 pm